When a bill designed to help new owners settle into unused industrial buildings left the state House, it was a half-page long and dealt with a single quirk of the state's building codes. It returned form the Senate as a complex, five-page measure that drew objections ...

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Yesterday afternoon the NC House concurred on a vote of 66-42 with the Senate on HB 201. Following a contentious and spirited floor debate, the bill will now be sent to the Governor for his signature. If signed, the new law will allow additions to existing buildings of unlimited size to be designed and constructed to the 2009 Energy Code.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

The energy code roll back bill finally left the Senate this afternoon and goes back to the House for a concurrence vote on amendments placed in the bill in the Senate.

The energy provisions, allowing the use of the 2009 energy code,  now apply to building renovations and additions. One disturbing aspect of the bill allows any size building to increase its size by 50% using the 2009 energy code.

 

 

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AuthorDavid Crawford

A heavily amended HB 201 was passed by the Senate tonight on a vote of 38-10. The Energy Code provisions are limited to existing buildings and additions to existing buildings. 

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Senator Ruccho explained in committee this afternoon that HB 1224 is intended to allow counties to take advantage of future broadening of the sales tax base. You will recall that the General Assembly failed to extend sales taxes to a broad array of services last year during the tax reform debate, yet Senate leaders have vowed to readress the issue in the future.

As the General Assembly systematically attempts to eliminate revenue sources from local jurisdictions it appears that the Senate is trying to build a constituency they lacked last year in the tax reform debate.

One theory holds, that by starving the cities and counties of traditional revenue sources, they will be more likely to work for, and support additional sales tax revenue from a broader service base to help backfill for lost revenue from recent legislative actions. 

One weakness in the Senate's attempt to radically shift the North Carolina tax base from income to sales based was the lack of support from any powerful lobbying factions. Forcing an alignment with local governments would create more leverage on legislators and pit service sector professions, like architecture, against powerful political allies in cities and counties.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

HB 201, the measure that would roll back the 2012 NC Energy Code to the 2009 version, has been lurking around the Legislature since last year. A coalition of design, construction and  clean energy business interests have been successful in slowing its progress but it appears to have new life and was amended on Thursday in the Senate Rules Committee...

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Yes, this is still hanging out there, and as the budget negotiations have dragged on, we are fearful that legislators in both chambers have forgotten that this is a critical piece of the budget bill and can't be forgotten in the rush to the end of session.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill on Monday that authorizes approximately $376 million of improvements that will directly benefit students at six University of North Carolina (UNC) institutions. Funds to pay for these projects will come from various fees, receipts, grants and fund raising income and not from tuition or taxpayer monies appropriated by the General Assembly.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Sen. Bob Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, along with other current GOP lawmakers, were co-sponsors of 1997 legislation that created the state's historic preservation tax credit program, the same program that today's Republicans are considering allowing to expire at the end of the year.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

@ncarchman: Rep Hagar offers amendment to coal ash bill for State Construction to study more uses of coal ash in building materials. Amendment adopted. 

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Last week the Senate passed a comprehensive bill to deal with Duke Energys 33 coal ash ponds that threaten North Carolina's water resources. The bill is being heard in the House Environment Committee today. One provision at the very end of the bill challenges the State Construction Office with this language: 

"§ 143‑58.6.  Specifications for Use of Coal Combustion Products.

(a)        State Construction Office to Develop Technical Specifications. – The State Construction Office shall develop recommended technical specifications for the use of coal combustion products that may be utilized in any construction by all State departments, institutions, agencies, community colleges, and local school administrative units, other than the Department of Transportation. The technical specifications shall address all products used in construction, including, but not limited to, the use of coal combustion products in concrete and cement products, and in construction fill."

http://mobile.ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/Senate/PDF/S729v3.pdf

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AuthorDavid Crawford

As a follow up to HB 857 from 2013, HB 1043 was introduced this session to address additional parameters for units of government in pre-qualifying contractors for public construction work. Also, additional parameters for qualifications based selection for design professionals has been included in the bill. 

The Senate voted 47-0 to adopt the measure, which now heads back to the House for concurrence. 

Posted
AuthorDavid Crawford

As a follow up to HB 857 from 2013, HB 1043 was introduced this session to address additional parameters for units of government in pre-qualifying contractors for public construction work. Also, additional parameters for qualifications based selection for design professionals has been included in the bill. 

The Senate voted 47-0 to adopt the measure, which now heads back to the House for concurrence. 

Posted
AuthorDavid Crawford

The NC House will vote on its version of the state budget on Thursday and it's still unclear whether it will include an extension, or a revamped version, of North Carolina's wonderfully successful historic preservation tax credits. There is a growing list of Republican leaders working with the proponents of the credits and they are readying amendments to salvage some of the credit program. Action is needed by architects, developers, contractors and all parties affected by the sunset of these credits to inform their House representatives about the need for this program. Find your representative here: http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/representation/WhoRepresentsMe.aspx. 

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AuthorDavid Crawford