The House and Senate finally rolled out a compromise budget on Monday night. The 429 page document details spending plans for all state agencies and includes a number of policy changes affecting industries across North Carolina. Here's a brief look at what we've been able to identify so far that affects the design and construction industry:

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Republican leaders in the state House rolled out their own version of Gov. Pat McCrory’s bond proposal Monday, calling for more infrastructure spending than the governor’s plan.

The House plan mirrors McCrory’s proposal on borrowing numbers: Both feature about $2.8 billion in bonds, which would go before voters in a special November election aimed for timing at taking advantage of low interest rates.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

AIA North Carolina asks its members to support the Governor's program and let their elected representatives in the House and Senate know that the design and construction industry is behind the Connect NC bond proposals.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

State lawmakers are considering measures that could make the future of solar industry cloudy just as the state and Cape Fear region are starting to shine.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Cities and counties would be unable to impose requirements with regard to color, siding style or window shape on new homes if a Senate bill (SB 25) approved Monday by the House Regulatory Reform Committee becomes law.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

The leaders of the state House and Senate said Tuesday that their caucuses wouldn't support a bond package for transportation and state infrastructure projects pushed by Gov. Pat McCrory that carries a $3 billion price tag. But House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger said legislators still are considering a smaller bond package -- mainly for projects such as university facilities and state government buildings -- to present to voters either in November or some time next year.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

The House Judiciary Committee passed out a study bill today intended to look at modernizing North Carolina's laws related to local zoning. What began as a project the State Bar Association undertook turned into a 100 page rewrite of zoning authority and land use policy contained in HB 548. 

Understanding that not all the stakeholders in local development had been party to negotiations on the measure, The Bar agreed to turn the bill into a year-long task force study. The new Task Forces' findings will be used for legislation in the 2016 session. 

The Task Force will have 16 stake holder members, one of which will be an architect recommended by AIA North Carolina.  

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AuthorDavid Crawford

4/14/2015 - The House Finance Committee accepted amendments to HB 255 this morning that eliminates the original idea in the bill of prohibiting local government from requiring plan review for residential building projects. The insurance implications of such a move became a barrier too high to overcome for the home building industry that had proposed the prohibition. 

Additionally, the bill adds to the concept of a statutorily authorized Residenditail Code Committee by also creating a reciprocal Commercial Building Code Committee. Each committee will have purview over the introduction of amendments to their respective building codes. Recommendations from each Committe will then be passed on to the full BCC for its deliberation and action. 

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Like the title of this iconic 1966 spaghetti western, every year the General Assembly brings us a plethora of exhilarating and cringe-worthy ideas. We've reach spring break for the 2015 legislative session and it gives us some time to look over the almost 1,300 bills that have been introduced so far. AIANC has identified dozens of bills for tracking and lobbying, but here's a brief look at the ones most architects should be keeping an eye on.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

By Patrick Gannon, Monday, March 2, 2015
RALEIGH – If history is a guide, the economic incentives package that begins a trek through the General Assembly this week won't face an easy path.

The "NC Competes Act," expected to be debated first by the House, includes an expansion of a widely used incentive based on job creation, the extension of a sales tax refund on jet fuel for American Airlines and a sales tax break on electricity for large data centers, among other provisions.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

As the 2015 General Assembly begins its work architects in North Carolina are keeping a close eye on issues affecting the design and construction industry. At a time when many sectors in the economy are showing great strides coming out of a long and painful recession, building is still relatively anemic. Three primary issues will top AIANC's agenda during this long session, Historic Preservation Tax Credits, Tax Reform and Infrastructure Financing. 

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AuthorDavid Crawford

(From THE INSIDER, 12/08/14)

Gov. Pat McCrory said Thursday he needs help impressing upon legislators the importance of the expiring Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit as the 2015 session nears, adding he was "not pleased" with lawmakers who left the program to sunset. It's kept North Carolina's venerable buildings in handsome shape, he said, giving visitors great first impressions needed for pride and economic development alike.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

Revenue Distribution (From The Insider 11/18/2014)

Changes could be ahead for North Carolina's method of distributing sales tax revenue as the Republican-led legislature rolls on with tax reform. Sen. Bob Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, says lawmakers are eyeing ideas that would potentially pull away from the status quo, a system that shines more on urban shopping destinations and less on low-income, rural areas.

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AuthorDavid Crawford

The Senate Rules Committee passed an amendment to a bill late this afternoon that would address some of the concerns school districts have about funding teacher aides but only if the House agrees to pass the Senate's measure that limits a county's ability to levy additional sales taxes. 

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AuthorDavid Crawford

The House included a modified form of the historic preservation tax credits in Senate Bill 763 on Thursday. The provision extends the law, due to expire at the end of this year, to January 1, 2020. The bill must now go back to the Senate for its approval.

It's expected that the Senate will complete its work on the State Budget tonight (July 31) and recess until August 14 at which time they will come back to Raleigh and deal with issues left unresolved during the short session. One of those issues will be the Historic Tax Credits. In addition the NC film credits and other tax law changes are in SB 763.

Key leaders in the Senate Republican Caucus have made it quite clear that they do not want to see any tax credits extended while they are attempting to totally revamp North Carolina's tax code. The intention by these leaders is to come back in 2015 and finish the overhaul of the tax code that fell short in 2013, by broadening of the sales tax to include most all services while eliminating personal and corporate income taxes.

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AuthorDavid Crawford